Posts Tagged playlist

RIPS Share Rollicking Playlist

RIPS Share Rollicking Playlist

RIPS' self-titled debut packs the kind of fervent rock energy that used to define New York City's music scene. It's impossible not to see the influence of bands such as Television, The Velvet Underground, and The Feelies on RIPS' sound, which puts them in a similar NYC rock revivalist territory to Parquet Courts (it is no surprise to see that Austin Brown of Parquet Courts produced RIPS' self-titled debut on Faux Discx). Yet, while the band wears their influences like signs for CBGB around their necks, their playlist below highlights a diversity of influences that lies well beyond those easy comparisons to early 70s and 80s NYC rock mainstays.

Listen to some of the band's favorite tracks below and come see them play Baby's All Right on July 1 for their record release show.

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Fear of Men Made Us a Gloomy British Playlist

Fear of Men Made Us a Gloomy British Playlist

Fear of Men, from Brighton, England, have spent the past month touring the US in support of Mitski. Before this stretch ends, the dream pop outfit will headline Baby's All Right on Sunday night, supported by both Toronto's Weaves and local bedroom pop breakout Yohuna. Ahead of this night, the band curated a playlist entitled British Miserabilsm, a hauntingly accurate title given the current state of both Britain and the US's political climates. Read what the band has to say below.

 

British Miserabilism: 1979-1989

The 1980’s was a bleak decade for the UK, blighted by a Thatcher government that greeted it and ushered it out. Preceded by ‘The Winter of Discontent’, a period of national strikes from 1978-79 which saw refuse left on the streets, blockades on hospitals, and bodies unburied, the country slipped into economic recession in 1980 and by 1982 unemployment had reached it’s highest figure for 50 years. By 1986 it hadn’t got much better, resulting in widespread rioting in 1986. It was against this backdrop that the bands forming in art schools across the country were making music, and a new expression of British miserabilism was formed, a nihilist post-punk movement with a set of aesthetic principles that would be adopted by artists throughout the decade and beyond.

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