Posts Tagged Features

Photo Gallery: AdHoc SXSW 2018

Photo Gallery: AdHoc SXSW 2018 Snail Mail (cred: AdHoc Staff)

Missed out on our two showcases at SXSW last week? No worries! Catch up with this sweet assortment of professional and polaroid pics from both of our showcases at Cheer Up Charlies in Austin!!


Palm (cred: Hayden Sitomer/AdHoc Staff)


Read More

Photo Gallery: Danny L Harle at Sunnyvale

Photo Gallery: Danny L Harle at Sunnyvale Photography by Nick Karp

Last Saturday March 17th, Danny L Harle brought his epic HARLECOR3 show featuring Serena Jana, Jen Mas, DJ Ocean and DJ Fuck to the Sunnyvale stage. Nick Karp got some sweet snaps of the evening – check them out below!

Read More

Slowing Down with Snail Mail

Slowing Down with Snail Mail Illustration by Anna True

A lot has changed for Lindsey Jordan since she played her first show in 2015, assembling an ad hoc crew to open for Priests and Sheer Mag at a festival. Snail Mail’s jangly, introspective sound—layered with the Ellicot City, Maryland native’s carefully constructed lyrics—belies the band’s spontaneous origins. In a little under three years, they’ve released an EP on Priest’s Sister Polygon label, toured the United States, and signed to a major indie—all while Lindsey was finishing up high school. Ahead of Snail Mail’s debut studio album, which is due out on Matador this summer, she spoke to us about being a feminist musician, balancing schoolwork with touring, and growing up. 
What inspired you to start playing music?
I don't know—it's just a hobby. I started playing guitar when I was five, and I didn't start writing songs until I was 12 or 13. I recorded an EP on Apple Garageband a really long time ago that's not on the internet anymore, and I formed a live band to play this one show—just for fun. Then we recorded the EP, Habit, because we had some friends that were willing to help us with it. Originally, our goal was to do these five or six songs, or whatever. I mean, I never really intended for it to go well, you know? 
What's the scene like in Baltimore? Was there any particular show or band or space that was really inspiring to you?
I hung out a lot at Black Cat in DC. I saw a lot of punk bands there, and I feel like that world was pretty encouraging as far as starting your own band. I don't know about now, but there are a lot of really great record stores in Baltimore. Celebrated Summer in Hampden is where I discovered a lot of the punk music I really love now.
DC is a really big place for punk. It's a really big creative hub, with a lot of DIY spaces, and there are a lot of young people doing awesome stuff. I have some friends who play in punk bands in Baltimore. I think [Baltimore has] got a culture of people who work really hard and think outside the box.
Read More

Photo Gallery: Secret Circle at Market Hotel

Photo Gallery: Secret Circle at Market Hotel Photos by Nick Karp

Last Wednesday March 7th, Secret Circle (WIKI, Antwon, Lil Ugly Mane) played their second crazy Brooklyn show this month at Market Hotel. Nick Karp was there to capture the magic – check out his images below.



Read More

Saint Marilyn’s “Burn Burn Burn” Will Get You Hot And Bothered

Saint Marilyn’s “Burn Burn Burn” Will Get You Hot And Bothered Photography by Jacque Donaldson

In the new video for Saint Marilyn’s “Burn Burn Burn,” two lovers embark on a serene, sensual forest drive, but something darker lurks beneath the surface.
"'Burn Burn Burn' is a song about how desire can easily turn into anger,” Che Houston, who represents one-half of the Brooklyn duo alongside Kevin Marksson, told AdHoc via email. “As the song’s co-writer and the video director, I wanted to expand on that theme through the music video.” 
Houston intersperses striking aerial shots of fall foliage with lustful gazes and bodies intertwining. The imagery complements the song's thundering percussion, enveloping synths, and impassioned vocals. 
“Our main character is inspired by the fiery wilderness around her—she feels powerful and sensual," Houston said. "When her gaze turns toward her partner, and he callously rejects it, it pushes her over that very thin line dividing affection and rage. Suddenly, her heightened energy is focused into anger and retaliation."
“Burn Burn Burn” is the first single off Saint Marilyn’s Tangle EP, which drops May 18 via Really Great Gum. Saint Mariyln will play their record release show at Alphaville on May 19.

Relive High School in The Happy Fits's “Best Tears” Video

Relive High School in The Happy Fits's “Best Tears” Video

The Happy Fits create fun-loving and upbeat indie rock that makes even the worst scenarios—like antagonizing high school bullies-—a little bit more tolerable. The Pittstown, New Jersey-based group, which comprises Calvin Langman on vocals and cello, Ross Monteith on guitar, and Luke Davis on drums, formed in 2016 with the purpose of fundraising for local charities.  Afterwards, they released a four song EP, Awfully Apeelin’. A week after the EP’s release, their single “While You Fade Away” reached #5 on Spotify’s Top 50 Viral Global Chart. The band is now gearing up for the release of their debut album Concentrate, released in partnership with Pledge Music, out on May 25th. 
Read More

Spiritual Cramp Made a Playlist of The California Artists That Inspire Them to Keep Creating

Spiritual Cramp Made a Playlist of The California Artists That Inspire Them to Keep Creating Photo by Tom O'Connell

San Francisco punks Spiritual Cramp are deeply connected to home. You can hear the influence of the original Bay Area punk sound within their songs, which are all honesty and no bullsit. They recently channeled their California roots and made a playlist for AdHoc.  "The people in Spiritual Cramp listen to a ton of different music which comes through in many ways that go beyond our songs," the band told AdHoc. "Inspiration is a funny thing that appears in all kinds of shapes and forms not limited to sound. With that said, here is a playlist of songs from California artists who inspire us to keep creating."

Read More

On Cranberry, Hovvdy Finds A Sense of Home

On Cranberry, Hovvdy Finds A Sense of Home Photography by Bronwyn Walls

Will Taylor and Charlie Martin met through mutual friends in the Austin music scene in 2014. They clicked automatically, sharing a fondness for the lo-fi sonics of home recordings and a common background in percussion. Soon after, they began recording no-frills, dreamy bedroom-pop on their iPhones, and released their first EP and cassette, ep, in December 2014.
Though they both grew up in Dallas, the band cites Austin—with its slow pace, expansive living spaces, and supportive community—as an inspiration. The hushed, fuzzy sounds on Cranberry, their second album, emit a feeling of intimate familiarity, the feeling of being at home.
Cranberry is out February 9 via Double Double Whammy. Ahead of their sold out album release show at Baby’s All Right tonight February 16, we talked with the band about recording on iPhones, taking up new instruments, and wanting to become a “shredder.”
AdHoc: How did Hovvdy begin?
Will Taylor: We met through mutual friends playing music in Austin. We hadn’t met until midway through 2014, and when we did, we decided that we’d meet up and hang out, and pretty quickly we shared songs that we had been working on at that time. We aligned stylistically and recorded some songs together. From there, continuing it felt like the right thing to do. It’s fun still. 
Charlie Martin: I second that. 


Read More

The Family Crest's New Video Is a Daytime TV Parody

The Family Crest's New Video Is a Daytime TV Parody Photograph by Christopher M. Howard

San Francisco's The Family Crest is not your run-of-the-mill indie rock band. With seven core musicians, and several hundred "Extended Family" members who have contributed to their music, the group likes to take the unconventional route in their music-making. Take, for example, their new video for “Never Gonna Stop,” a track from their forthcoming The War: Act I. Stitching together over ten comedic sketches, which range from a parody of The Joy of Painting to a reenactment of Godzilla, it encapsulates the ridiculousness of daytime television.


Liam McCormck, founder, as well as vocals and lead guitar, of The Family Crest, told via email AdHoc that making the video was a "very DIY process," with the band collectively creating "about 25 different individual stations." "It took a lot of production creativity, from figuring out convertible rentals to digging through our closets for costumes," he wrote. "We had a lot of fun with it. It put many of us out of our comfort zones, which is always a good thing in the end." McCormick says that his overall goal for the video was to convey feeling "of someone flipping through channels on TV, seemingly endlessly, with all of us playing out various tableaux."


"It all started in on a 1AM phone call, as things usually do, where Liam told me that Laura had an amazing idea of putting John in a leotard and having him teach a workout class, '80s style," the video's director, Keith Lancaster, told AdHoc. "John is basically the designated cartoon character of the bunch. We thought it would be even better to make something as if you’re flipping through channels on the TV, and he is the main character in everything that pops up. But then we got the rest of the band involved, and it became something way more collaborative and fun. I’m still kind of surprised that we pulled it off in such a short amount of time and it [came] out nearly identical to how it was in my head. It’s really fun to see the personalities of everybody shine through."


You can watch the video for "Never Gonna Stop" below.


Dark Blue Lament a Gentrifying Philadelphia on "Fight to Love"

Dark Blue Lament a Gentrifying Philadelphia on Photo by Manuel Dominguez Jr.

Philly natives (and Eagles fans) Dark Blue are gearing up for their next seven-inch release, out February 23rd on 12XU. The A-side, “Fight to Love," feels like a dark cloud after a drought, a much-needed cleansing. Over a steady beat and melodic fuzz, Singer and guitarist John Sharkey narrates a tricky love/hate relationship with a gentrifying Philadelphia. Toward the end, the underlying wash of guitars gives way to a beautiful acoustic rendition of the tune, picking back up and reiterating the song's central message: “You shouldn’t have come here.”

“Philadelphia is a great city but it’s being overrun by developers with tax abatements and snobs from the outer suburbs," Sharkey told AdHoc via email. "This song is a direct response to all the muppets who move from what might as well be Iowa and complain when we have a parade for the city’s most beloved sports team because their kids (I mean dogs) won’t be able to get to get to yoga. GO BIRDS!” This reflection on their hometown's current state is an apropos look at the way the things we love change as they grow and morph. Even as our homes begin to change and our old haunts disappear, we still have a love for where we came from.

Catch them on February 15th at Saint Vitus, opening for American Nightmare.


Read More