Posts by Tabs Out

Who Has Tapes Anymore #15

Who Has Tapes Anymore #15

In this fifteenth installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore?, Mike Haley and Ian Franklin of Tabs Out brings you some of their favorite cassette releases of the last month.

Tlaotlon/Střed Světa split (Baba Vanga)
You've probably been wanting to get a Slurpee machine in your house for a while now. The ability to pull a handle and dispense oozy frozen goodness in the comfort of your own home would be a life changing experience, but let's face it, the logistics just don't make sense. May I suggest gripping this split and poppin' it in your deck as an alternative? You'll still be able to receive an analogous sludge stream of baffling broth in an array of hyper colors and flavors, but without the cleanup and straws. Tlaotlon and Střed Světa both gnaw and chomp sounds on their shared cassette, recently released on the ever-impressive Baba Vanga label. It's a patchwork of bonker noises that fizz and splat in an acidic vapor bouillon. So strange, so delicious, and HIGHLY recommended.

Head Dress: Warren (Phinery)

Building slowly with large stretches of cavernous synth tones, Warren, the new C28 from Head Dress on Denmark’s Phinery Tapes, beckons you further down it’s circular halls. Utilizing a growing crescendo motif, the tension builds and builds without overplaying it’s hand and losing balance. The mood lays thick on the first track and continues it’s grip in the second track, “300”. Here, Head Dress increases the tension without increasing the instrumentation. The drone is a pulsating manic heart beat in a room full of shadows. Side B kicks it off with a dizzying sway of chromatic syncopation, lining up with a passing octave but for the most part remaining in harmonic tension. The bouncing ball is so finely layered with harmonics that it feels like a three-dimensional object bouncing around an empty chamber. Warren is filled with lush drone, ominous tension, and mesmerizing passages, my only complaint would be that it’s not longer.

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore #14

Who Has Tapes Anymore #14

In this fourteenth installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore?, Mike Haley and Ian Franklin of Tabs Out brings you some of his favorite cassette releases of the last month.

Charles Barabé: Dates & Confessions (Tranquility)

Dates & Confessions is probably the strongest effort from Charles Barabé, a dude who seems to up the ante of his sonic experimentation with each release. The ten tracks on this Tranquility tape (4 "dates" and 6 "confessions") are sizable in scope and momentum, a contemplative sculpting of dazzling electronics, gyratory spasms of tones, and intriguing field recordings, found sounds, and/or synthesized voices. All of those elements spiral together, handily bringing the listener in and out of distinct moods. If you give Dates & Confessions a listen in a hyper-focused state-- similar to the one Barabé was most definitely in while creating it-- you'll easily be able to envision the sounds as an anatomical cross section: complex and divergent material working together. Thick & Thin. Wet & Dry. Bone & Meat. Veins & Nerves. Dates & Confessions.

Future Ape Tapes: Pyramirrormid (Hooker Vision)
Opening out into a clearing of loosely tied together slurry of freeform drumming and bass and synth drone improvisation, Future Ape Tapes start off Pyramirrormid, as though they were dropping the listener into a lush geographic zone of melted flora. And out of nowhere we pop into an oasis clearing with stuttery percussive rolling, deep bass movements, and melodic shimmers of light. The journey continues, however, and we jump straight back into the organized chaos of improvisation jungle, brilliant pathways of light dripping through the canopy-- a free form organization of transient and tangible energies. Through the course of the 40 minutes here, Future Ape Tapes (with the help of a few of their friends on added percussive elements) utilize an approach with full effectiveness: shifting effortlessly from free form explorations into structured pieces of psychedelic and melodic blow-out and back again, all while maintaining a sense of purposeful direction and continuity. Throw this tape on and time will literally dissolve around you. I could say a lot more about this tape but you should probably just grab it and take the ride yourself.

Arnvs: Peltre (Vwyrd Wurd)
Vwyrd Wurd always comes through with some splendid surprises. It's a label you don't hear much fuss about, which should change, because they steadily pump out solid tapes from their Bethlehem Pennsylvania headquarters. One such example is Peltre, from their latest batch, by the artist(s) Arnvs. It's dance music, but I suspect you'll be far too paranoid to shake your groove thang to its tense, ambient flow. It's like the Halloween 4 soundtrack with spiders crawling on a drum machine which, turns out, is great.

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #13

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #13

In this 13th installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore? Mike Haley and Ian Franklin of Tabs Out bring you some of their favorite cassette releases of the past month, and then a couple from before that.

Sleep Museum: The Vitrine Of Blindness (Golden Cloud)
Sleep Museum has the ability to put you into another person's skin. His targeting and execution of audible aesthetics and flavors are so definite and romantic that the you become the perfect listener. The hour spent savoring The Vitrine Of Blindness is like watching a biopic about yourself, with this the soundtrack. Flirtatious synths and drum programming wrap you in a thick, maroon turtle neck sweater. The codeine-soaked torrent of vocal malaise hands you a cigarette (in holder), places sunglasses on your face (in doors), and sets you down nicely in some Danish furniture.

Looks Realistic: VA/A (Beer On The Rug)
VA/A could very well be a live stream of an apprehensive, pansexual orgy going on right now on the International Space Station. There is an erotic oddness wafting through the entire recording with it's foamy stretches of aromatic casualness and floundering, confused droplets of hyper-sensitive pings. They are still working the robotic arms and stuff, but not for the intended use. That much is obvious. I just pray to God that we're getting off more than the Russians.

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #12

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #12

In this 12th installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore? Mike Haley, John Pyle, and Ian Franklin of Tabs Out bring you some of their favorite cassette releases of the past month.

Czern: Mind In Transit (Castle Bravo)

Your full attention will be required during Mind In Transit, as it's silky synth campaigns and creep-level opaqueness cycle through their myriad of textures and balance. Czern is a name that has never entered my ear holes before. The same goes for Castle Bravo, the label that released this four track diamond, but I think it's safe to say that they are both now on my radar. Heavy concentration is put into play as you are gradually dipped into a buttery ocean of slothy industrial rhythms and cascading oscillations sprees. Darkness is obvious, but not overwhelming, compounded by buoyant and playful layers of analog and digital synth prodding. This one will leave stretch marks on your memory. Super small edition of 25 copies.

Brotman & Short: Distance Unknown (Chondritic Sound)

Analog minimal cold wave synthesis at its finest. Everything here is restrained, focused, and purposeful. Truly subtractive. Even if you have (as I have) felt totally overwhelmed by the number of synth and beat-oriented projects coming out of the experimental music scene, this is worth your time.

Grandma Lo-Fi: The Basement Tapes Of Sigríður Níelsdóttir (Hornbuckle)

In the 90's there was a West Philadelphia neighborhood staple who went by the name Grandma Dynamite who would hang outside punk shows and grip change from people in Dropdead shirts. I think she once got naked during a Piebald set. Anyway, I always thought Grandma Dynamite was the most intense member the eldery community had to offer. Grandma Lo-Fi provides some fierce competition. It took seventy-some years to get going, but in that advanced age Grandma Lo-Fi began writing and recording intimiate and peculiar outsider melodies. Tiny songs of colossal whimsy with Casio keyboard presets, toy xylophones, and samples of pets getting the job done. This cassette is a modest collection from her enormous catalog of hundres of songs. If interested, and you should be, I wrote a bit more about The Basement Tapes Of Sigríður Níelsdóttir here.

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #11

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #11

In this eleventh installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore?, Mike Haley and Ian Franklin of Tabs Out brings you some of their favorite cassette releases of the last month.

Ben Varian: Real Domestic Scene (Patient Sounds)
When "normal" people try to make "weird" music it's always a disaster. It sounds bogus at a 99.9% rate. But when "weird" people pursue "normal" music... Shit, kid, somehow it's consistently amazing. Ben Varian's take on pop music leaves my brain throbbing. His ridiculous transitions from funky prom-riffs into zoink behavior, all with tender loving vocals holding your hand and massaging your thighs, possesses an evil brilliance. He brings you into states of unusual comfortableness with some Jerry Paperish tunes as he croons over electronic lounge numbers. Excreting  a kooky normalcy-- like listening to Billy Joel in a house that is being fumigated-- as wayward key runs jitter and jive. You would feel at ease letting this music pet-sit your pug for the week even though you saw it fly off in a spaceship just last night.

HRRR: ADWA (self released)
This self-released jammer is limited to 30 copies and still available because the world is crammed with fools and dweebs. HRRR delivers three tracks on ADWA (i don't think either of those are words?). The A-side is a side-long jaunt of mean rythmns encapsulated in menacing flutters and siren sweeps. Two tracks on the B-side; a dirty techno rager with mind drilling beats and a 3 minute ambient drift away sesh. This is a fucking boss ass tape and you should grip it at once!

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #10

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #10

In this tenth installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore?, Mike Haley, Ian Franklin, and John Pyle of Tabs Out brings you some of his favorite cassette releases of the last month.

Mugen Series: Volumes 5, 6, 7, & 8 (Hausu Mountain)
Huzzah! The most recent round of splits on Hausu Mountain’s Mugan Series are here. For the uninitiated, these four cassettes are the second round of a series where HM matches up jammers and gives them the duty of recording raw, unedited material. Since they are all bonkers I’m not going to try to pick my fav, just advise you to grip the lot while you still can. The squads this time around are paired up nicely by utilized instruments. Let’s slalom through this shit, shall we? Spectrum Control & CarRl grab axes for some psychedelic soul searching, both shacking up scorched earth guitar riffage, blistering fits of drones, and shifting melodies. Quicksails & Headboggle partner up for a second time (they shared a split on the resting Discriminate Music bonus series) for some synth drifts. Quicksails brewing up some tense sci-fi tunes, providing mechanical blops and uplifting, glittery dreamsounds while The Boggle goes steady and sparse with Serge surges that flutter and crack. There’s a  percussive situation on the Fluxbikes/Quidditas split. Flux starting things off with a slow boil droner, working in the patchouli zone drumming. Quid brings the pounding in from the start getting a distorted, gnarly riffer going on. Fire alarm electronics and an abrasive discharged rumble belt out like churning gears begging for oil until the motor blows. The Telecult Powers boys, Witchbeam and Mister Matthews, round things out. The Witchbeam track is a rough take on his recent blasters: cryptic sputters being crushed by damaged oscillators. Overwhelming buildups of managed feedback and looped vocal sampling crashing and decay in haunting displays. Mr. M straight blazes three prodigious tracks on his side. The first, a parade static rythms and beats held together with silly putty, playing like a NIN bootleg tape left on the dashboard over the summer. The second a treat of wet-ponytail leads and solar drips floating in and out of melody. He concludes with some batshit patterns for little green men to pop and lock to. You’ll need electrolytes and/or a cat nap after this sesh, so go into it boy scout style.

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #9

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #9

In this ninth installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore?, Mike Haley, Ian Franklin, and John Pyle of Tabs Out brings you some of their favorite cassette releases of the last month.

Tredici Bacci: The Thirteen Kisses Cassetta (NNA)
Ad Hoc readers, I don’t know what stargate I walked through to end up in a world where this is being released on a DIY cassette label, I’m just so happy that I made it here. You’d expect to find The Thirteen Kisses Cassetta on an old, dusty import LP, perhaps a soundtrack for a forgotten 1970s Italian film, but nah. It’s a tape on NNA, which makes it even better than it already is. Which is saying something. Tredici Bacci is a squad of 14 musicians under the guidance of Guerilla Toss’ Simon Hanes. They make elegant, exhilarating, and beautifully composed/performed/recorded soundtrack-inspired music. Trumpets and percussion gush luxurious sounds. Gorgeous voices, spirited strings, and an ability to spring through emotions mark each track. Seriously, I am in awe. This one is a must!

L.A. County Morgue/Pleasure Bros: Split (Mazurka Editions)
“Rotten, swollen fruit fallen from obscene, petulant trees.” Unclassifiable and saturated in dank basement ambiance. Sold out from the label but still available stateside from Analog Worship and Skeleton Dust.

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #8

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #8

In this eight installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore?, Mike Haley and Ian Franklin of Tabs Out brings you some of their favorite cassette releases of the last month.

Dane Patterson: Ghosting (Fabrica)
Sound and visual artist Dane Patterson spends 27 strange minutes on Ghosting pinching and warping auditory surroundings, devising weaves of damp whispers and leathery static crashes. Try this simple exercise: Take a few sheets of vellum paper and write out some thoughts with a thick Sharpie. Now, rip those sheets of paper in half and crumble them into balls. Okay, now uncrumble them and tape them back together at random and read what you got. Did you do it? (I know you didn’t but let’s pretend you did). Think about what the audio version of that might sound like. Ideas sloshed and dissolved into each other. That is ghosting. A smarter person than I could probably make an analogy to this tape and Patterson’s visual work. While you search for that person on Craig’s List or Reddit or whatever I’m going to pack another bowl and get lost in Ghosting a few more times.

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #7

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #7

In this seventh installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore?, Mike Haley, Ian Franklin, and John Pyle of Tabs Out brings you some of their favorite cassette releases of the last month. Tabs Out celebrated its second birthday this past weekend.

Jeremiah Fisher: Martyrboys (Tonal Shit Research)
What you are diving into here is laser synthesis crawling deep inside the rain forest. Ya got one foot in a puddle, the other planted firmly on a hover board. This rich Silurian session from Jeremiah Fisher is our most recent Tape Of The Month over at Tabs Out. Fisher licks the toads, his synthesizers become them, and the following 30 minutes is an essential nudging of the brain. Pokes, prods, and splashes of absorbing sounds.

Surplus Killing: Loss Of Face (Unseen Force)
Full-on, kick-you-in-the-teeth assault is what this tape from duo Surplus Killing is about. With 32 songs in under 10 minutes, this release is staggering in its execution. No time is wasted and everything matters. Grind and noise combine with hairpin turns, stop-on-a-dime rhythm changes, and sonic howls of torment. Unrelenting and unforgiving, this is the closest thing to controlled chaos. Best played from start to finish for the full, blistering mind shakedown.

Read More

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #6

Who Has Tapes Anymore? #6

In this sixth installment of Who Has Tapes Anymore?, Mike Haley of Tabs Out brings you some of his favorite cassette releases of the last month.

((Husband Material)): Go Ahead And Start The Family Without Me (Patient Sounds)
Go Ahead And Start The Family Without Me is a belly flop into syrup falls. You go in dry and come out tacky to the touch, drenched in viscous beats, samples, and drones. This was our January Tape Of The Month over at Tabs Out because of its Flying Lotus meets Michael Keaton in-his-hay-day stylings. Callous pulses are arranged in ways to make you nod your head and scratch your temples. I think you’ll enjoy it as much as I did. Or perhaps you are not husband/wife material and will live out your days alone with a house full of cats.

Bit Shifter: Life’s A Bit Shifter (Hornbuckle)
I am not well versed in the world of chiptune, and at 33-- raising two youngin’s-- the task of navigating the labyrinth of a new genre frightens me to my poorly maintained core. So while I admit I won't be actively engulfing all there is to offer in the universe of sound, I do like to poke my head in and do some sampling. After a brief scouting I’ve decided that Bit Shifter will be my 8-bit ambassador. Life’s A Bit Shifter is a remastered cassette version of a 2003 CD release with a few bonus tracks, bringing the tally up to 17 in all. All sounds were created and performed on a Game Boy, something you can tell and not tell, if that makes sense. It’s obvious because of the NES style sound bits, but totally not obvious because it’s done so fucking well. Such an amazing release. Thanks for holding my hand through this Castlevania experience, Bitsy.

Read More