Posts by AdHoc Staff

AdHoc Issue 16 is Here

AdHoc Issue 16 is Here

AdHoc Issue 16 is here! Grab a PDF of the zine here, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. (Those of you outside New York City can order a copy here as well.)

Many Americans are glad that 2016 is almost over; some rightfully fear that 2017 will be even worse. It’s tough to know what to cling to in a world governed by xenophobic politicians and a clickbait-reliant media, and some think that making and writing about music can feel pretty frivolous at a time like this. Here at AdHoc, we believe that our first order of business is to consider the ways we can make a positive difference in our communities—not just as artists and writers and music enthusiasts, but as citizens and fellow human beings. Still, we also can’t imagine powering through these dark times without music as a source of spiritual strength, and a channel for opposition.

For this issue, we spoke to some of the people in this city who have worked long and hard to keep the city's counterculture alive—a counterculture that, for many of us, feels more urgently necessary than it did just a month ago. The founder and curator of beloved Bushwick music venue Palisades—which shuttered in October after an extended bureaucratic struggle with authorities—speak out for the first time about the venue’s closure, sharing the history of the space and lessons they’ve learned about nurturing live music in a city that seems increasingly hostile to it. We also spoke to Parquet Courts frontman and visual artist Andrew Savage about the band’s forthcoming multi-media event, Knock! Knock! Down! Down!, and the importance of using music and art to engage with the cultural and political realities of our time. Sometimes we lose the battles we fight, but these members of our community incarnate the value of staying focused, moving forward with open mind, and finding new ways to connect and create.

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AdHoc Issue 16's contributors:

Miguel Gallego is a writer, musician, and lay-about living in the big city and feebly pursuing his dreams. For this issue, he interviewed Andrew Savage of Parquet Courts.

Ariel Bitran and Leeor Waisbrod ran Palisades; in this issue, they talk about the origins and end of the venue, as told to AdHoc's Emilie Friedlander.

Preston Spurlock made the Palisades posters that appear on the cover of this issue, as well as the illustrations included to the right, on the back cover, and in our oral history of the venue.

EyeBodega designed the issue.

Fear of Men Made Us a Gloomy British Playlist

Fear of Men Made Us a Gloomy British Playlist

Fear of Men, from Brighton, England, have spent the past month touring the US in support of Mitski. Before this stretch ends, the dream pop outfit will headline Baby's All Right on Sunday night, supported by both Toronto's Weaves and local bedroom pop breakout Yohuna. Ahead of this night, the band curated a playlist entitled British Miserabilsm, a hauntingly accurate title given the current state of both Britain and the US's political climates. Read what the band has to say below.

 

British Miserabilism: 1979-1989

The 1980’s was a bleak decade for the UK, blighted by a Thatcher government that greeted it and ushered it out. Preceded by ‘The Winter of Discontent’, a period of national strikes from 1978-79 which saw refuse left on the streets, blockades on hospitals, and bodies unburied, the country slipped into economic recession in 1980 and by 1982 unemployment had reached it’s highest figure for 50 years. By 1986 it hadn’t got much better, resulting in widespread rioting in 1986. It was against this backdrop that the bands forming in art schools across the country were making music, and a new expression of British miserabilism was formed, a nihilist post-punk movement with a set of aesthetic principles that would be adopted by artists throughout the decade and beyond.

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AdHoc Issue 15 is Here

AdHoc Issue 15 is Here

AdHoc Issue 15, presented by The Talkhouse, is here! Grab a PDF of the zine here, and look out for physical copies at our shows. (Those of you outside New York City can order a copy here as well.)

In the late ’90s, musicologist Christopher Small coined the term “musicking”: “music,” construed as a verb. It’s a concept that describes music, not merely in terms of sound, but as the sum of the human relationships it occasions: between players on a stage, between musicians and audience members, between the audience members themselves. Whether we’re listening to somebody pour her heart out on record or performing our own songs for a sea full of strangers, music is an inherently social activity—one that involves a sharing of expression and experience. Here at AdHoc, we “music” all the time, fostering exchange between artists, fans, and other scene players at our shows and outside of them, including with the zine you’re holding in your hands right now.

For AdHoc Issue 15, we teamed up with fellow Brooklyn-based publication The Talkhouse—a platform that shares our conviction in artist-artist and artist-fan exchange—and asked some of our favorite artists to zoom in on the aspect of music that seems to involve the most “musicking”: the live experience. Body/Head’s Bill Nace and Ben Greenberg of Uniform chat about improvisation, and legendary composer Rhys Chatham and Tredici Bacci’s Simon Hanes discuss composition—only to reveal that the one really isn’t that different from the other. The Thermals’ Hutch Harris and Springtime Carnivore mastermind Greta Morgan write about some of the joys and challenges of being on tour, while Man Man’s Honus Honus gives us some sage advice on how to enjoy your next Saturday night out without acting like an asshole. Along the way, they reveal how “musicking” with others makes for a continuing source of inspiration. Nace, who also made this issue’s cover art, puts it best: “It’s just about hitting the stage and being open to what’s happening.”

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AdHoc Issue 15 features the following contributors:

Tommy Siegel is a Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter-guitarist- bassist-producer in Jukebox the Ghost, Narc Twain, and Drunken Sufis. He made the cartoon that appears in this issue.

Ben Greenberg plays in the band Uniform and solo under the name Hubble, in addition to producing, engineering, and mixing records at the studio Strange Weather in Brooklyn. For this issue, he interviewed Body/Head’s Bill Nace.

Bill Nace is a guitarist, visual artist, and label owner who splits his time between Western Massachusetts and Los Angeles. He made the collage that appears on the cover of this issue.

Simon Hanes leads Tredici Bacci, a 14-piece ensemble that plays original compositions inspired by the grand tradition of Italian film music from the 60s and 70s; their new album, Amore Per Tutti, is out November 11 on NNA Tapes. For this issue, Simon interviewed minimalist composer Rhys Chatham.

Ryan Kattner, aka Honus Honus, is a musician-songwriter, film/ theater score composer, screenwriter, and mustachioed multi- hyphenate living in Los Angeles; he has fronted the bands Man Man and Mister Heavenly, and is releasing his first solo album this year. In this issue, he educates readers in proper concert etiquette.

Hutch Harris founded and is the lead singer/songwriter of Portland post-pop-punk band the Thermals. For this issue, he whipped up a list of essentials for touring bands.

Greta Morgan is a singer-songwriter who has performed with the Hush Sound, Gold Motel, and Springtime Carnival. For this issue, she wrote about how summer camp prepared her for living on the road.

Leesh Adamerovich is a Brooklyn-based illustrator who enjoys collaborating with musicians. Her work is in uenced by ’70s music, animation, and quiet moments, and she drew the portraits in this issue.

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In addition to online and at our shows, you can find physical copies of AdHoc Issue 15 at any of the following businesses around New York City:

Academy Records, Greenpoint
Artbook @ MoMA PS1, Long Island City
Cafe Grumpy, Greenpoint
Commend, Lower East Side
Coop 87, Greenpoint
LIC Corner Cafe, Long Island City
Little Skips, Bushwick
Printed Matter, Chelsea
Spoonbill & Sugartown, Williamsburg

AdHoc Issue 14 is Here

AdHoc Issue 14 is Here

In AdHoc Issue 14, we talk about origins. What was the music you loved as a child? Who were the artists you first tried to emulate? How have your taste, your ideas, and your communities changed over time? We spoke to two acts, both of whom got early starts playing music, about their artistic influences and development: outré pop icon Gary Wilson and P.S. Eliot's Allison and Katie Crutchfield. Aesthetically, the two don't have too much in common; Gary Wilson mixes lounge music with avant-garde composition, and Allison and Katie—now known for their work with Swearin' and Waxahatchee respectively—veer towards punk rock. Still, both exemplify the ideal of striving to make the best art you can while staying true to the music and communities that helped form who you are.

If you'd like to order a copy, though, you can do so here for a physical edition; you can download the PDF here. You can also find physical copies at the following locations in New York City:

Academy Records, Greenpoint
Artbook @ MoMA PS1, Long Island City
Cafe Grumpy, Greenpoint
Commend, Lower East Side
Coop 87, Greenpoint
LIC Corner Cafe, Long Island City
Little Skips, Bushwick
Printed Matter, Chelsea
Spoonbill & Sugartown, Williamsburg

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Leesh Adamerovich is a Brooklyn-based illustrator who enjoys collaborating with musicians. Her work is in uenced by ’70s music, animation, and quiet moments, and she drew the portraits in this issue.

Eric Copeland is an artist and musician who designed the color poster in this issue. His recent releases include the Black Bubblegum LP on DFA, the Brooklyn Banks LP on Palmetto, and a book, Pidgin Coup, published by Moon Hill Media.

Nick Corbo is an artist and member of the band LVL UP. He designed the front cover of the zine; that drawing—along with other drawings like it—is for sale at spiritwas.tumblr.com.

All designed by EyeBodega, this issue also features a full listing of upcoming AdHoc shows.

AdHoc Issue 13 is Here

AdHoc Issue 13 is Here

AdHoc Issue 13 is here! AdHoc organizes a lot of concerts throughout New York City. If you're reading this, you've probably been to at least one—and hopefully, watching people play music at Market Hotel or Trans-Pecos or wherever it was, you felt safe. After the events in Orlando earlier this summer, in which 49 people were killed and dozens more wounded at the LGBTQ club Pulse, we've been thinking a lot about what it means for a music venue to be a safe space—not just in the sense of physical safety (though that's obviously important), but in terms of being a place where people can come together and safely express themselves.

Inevitably, complications arise when we try to make our spaces more inclusive; selectively diversifying line-ups isn’t necessarily enough. Is the venue’s support staff diverse, too? What about ensuring that audience members from all walks of life feel welcome? Is it okay to exclude certain people, especially those who threaten others’ safety?

In her recent essay, "The Identity Artist and the Identity Critic," Berlin-based artist and writer Hannah Black outlines how art institutions often cultivate a false facade of inclusion, tokenizing minority artists and workers while maintaining an established— usually white, patriarchal—order. Black argues that to truly foster diversity, museums and galleries face the task of creating a “meaningful collectivity”— without elision, domination, or uninflected hierarchy." Of course, establishing such a collectivity isn’t an easy—or, as Black says, “cozy”—process. Often, it can necessitate rebuilding our institutional structures from the bottom up.

But what does this meaningful collectivity look like in the sphere of live music, a commercial model dependent on ticket and drink sales? Simply adding a female performer to a festival lineup or putting an artist of color on an otherwise all-white bill may keep institutional hierarchies intact. Perhaps, as Black suggests, making our venues safer necessitates a radical overhaul the entire operation, from our curatorial and hiring practices to our pay structures and the strategies we use to ensure that everybody present feels safe. In this issue, we asked members of our community to help us imagine what such a reconfiguration might look like.

If you'd like to order a copy, though, you can do so here for a physical edition; you can download the PDF here. You can also find physical copies at the following locations in New York City:

Academy Records, Greenpoint
Artbook @ MoMA PS1, Long Island City
Cafe Grumpy, Greenpoint
Commend, Lower East Side
Coop 87, Greenpoint
LIC Corner Cafe, Long Island City
Little Skips, Bushwick
Printed Matter, Chelsea
Spoonbill & Sugartown, Williamsburg

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AdHoc Issue 13 features the following contributors doing the following things:

* Shannon Shaw is a musician and artist residing in Oakland, California. She sings and plays bass in the band Shannon and the Clams—and made the cover of this issue.

* As Circuit des Yeux and alter-ego Jackie Lynn, Chicago-based artist Haley Fohr uses sounds to embody the full spectrum of emotions that we all experience. For this issue, she wrote an essay reflecting on uncomfortable experiences she has had as an artist and performer.

* Domenic Palermo spends most of his time playing in the band Nothing, when he's not at his home in NYC wasting away. He contributed poetry and photography to this issue.

* Nina Mashurova is a member of Silent Barn’s programming team. They also write about music and culture and co-book a reading series called TFW. In this issue, Nina shares strategies for venue owners, promoters, artists, and music fans looking to help make our venues safer.

* All designed by EyeBodega, this issue also features a full listing of upcoming AdHoc shows.

The So So Glos Share Some Market Hotel Memories

The So So Glos Share Some Market Hotel Memories

While living off of meager meals and huddling together for warmth during a brutal winter, Brooklyn vets The So So Glos put together what little resources they had to build Market Hotel. They return to their beloved spot this Saturday with Big Ups, Honduras and Bueno and will be running a #FeedTheStreet food drive for local nonprofit, City Harvest. Be sure to bring canned food to donate at the show! 
 
The band shared some memories with AdHoc as well as photos and music from the archives of their time at Market. 
 
​I remember living off dollar rice from the Chinese food store across the street and huddling together without heat or a shower in the dead of winter. We built a loft and laid 7 mattresses on top of a construction site and slept like that for a few months (before building walls). Setting up the market was rough & it was hard work, but the payoff has been well worth it. The original vision- an all inclusive, enormous community show space whose walls were seeping with nyc history. I'm glad to see it make a comeback while staying true to the original vision. I'm also grateful to be playing again- this time should be less work, more fun. - Alex Levine 
 
I remember our first time walking up the stairs on the Broadway side with the landlord. It was me, Alex, Zach, and Joe Ahern. We hit the top landing and the landlord turned the lights on from the electrical box and we saw the triangle shape for the first time and a train went by and [it] felt like we had found our own ninja turtles hangout and knew this spot was the Market Hotel. - Ryan Levine
 

 

Check out their song named after the venue recorded back in '07 in Oakland, half a year before they officially founded it in March 2008.

 

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AdHoc is Free

AdHoc is Free

AdHoc Issue 12 is here! If you’ve purchased any of our previous issues, you may notice that this one’s a little different: shorter, more playful-looking, on newsprint, and free. This last quality is very important to us: we’re always looking for ways to make our publications and shows as accessible and inclusive as possible. And in keeping with the principle of adhocism—a fancy word for building the world you want to see using the resources at your disposal—each issue will be a team effort, bringing together writing, artwork, and design from musicians, artists, and other movers and shakers in the greater New York music community and beyond. For now, we’ll be distributing them during AdHoc shows. Keep your eyes peeled for a copy next time you go out—tell your friends, too! Thanks for checking it out, and we’ll see you around.

If you'd like to order a copy, though, you can do so here for a physical edition; you can download the PDF here.

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AdHoc Issue 12 features the following contributors doing the following things:

* Ben Greenberg just changed his contact lenses for the first time in two years and he thinks you look great. He plays in the band Uniform and solo under the name Hubble, in addition to producing, engineering, and mixing records at the studio Strange Weather in Brooklyn. For this issue, he interviewed rock gods the Melvins about their career and the state of rock & roll.

* Victoria Ruiz is the lead singer of the Downtown Boys. She is inspired by her bandmates and family. She writes for The Spark Mag, Fvck the Media, and Impose Magazine—and contributed this issue’s featured essay about the complicated relationship between race and rock, in conversation with Emilie Friedlander.

A. Savage is an artist living in New York City. His hobbies include karaoke and Tex-Mex, and he made the artwork on the cover of this zine.

Sara Lautman is an illustrator and cartoonist. She likes to swim, and has published cartoons with The New Yorker, Jezebel, Tablet, and elsewhere. Her tweets are on Twitter (@saralautman) and her sketchbooks are on Instagram (@slautow).

* All designed by EyeBodega, this issue also features a full listing of upcoming AdHoc shows, plus a schedule of concerts for this week's Northside Festival.
 

 

A photo posted by EyeBodega (@eyebodega) on

Some Musings on Trip Metal in Advance of This Weekend's Trip Metal Festival in Detroit

Some Musings on Trip Metal in Advance of This Weekend's Trip Metal Festival in Detroit

It's a tale often told: in late 2013, John Olson of iconic Detroit avant-garde troupe Wolf Eyes told the Miami New Times that noise was over—and that Wolf Eyes were, in his words, "what I call a trip metal band." Two-and-a-half years and several thousand memes later, what trip metal is exactly remains unclear. Nonetheless, there's a whole festival now for the genre Olson coined: Trip Metal Fest in Detroit, taking place this weekend (May 27 to 29). The festival (which has free admissions) features performances by Hieroglyphic Being with Marshall Allen and Danny Ray Thompson of the Sun Ra Arkestra, Rubber (O) Cement, Morton Subotnick, and several more luminaries in the world of out-there music. There will also be film screenings, including a never-before-seen film by Aaron Dilloway and Andrew W.K. called Poltergeist, as well as Tony Conrad's Articulation of Boolean Algebra for Film Opticals and Kenneth Anger's My Demon Brother. Are all of these things "trip metal"? Maybe, maybe not. In any event, we got some oblique background on the "genre" and the fest from Wolf Eyes co-founders John Olson and Nate Young, plus the group's manager (and festival co-organizer) Forest Juziuk.

Nate Young: Trip Metal is elevating the role of confusion and jokes over the endless discussion of authenticity—the threat of joking is the ultimate destroyer of creativity. People ask if something is authentic, but they don't ask if it's good or funny—or confusing which is a feeling that encompasses all that. We are concerned with rejected people, total misfits, and freak scenes from every era. These are our people. People freaked out about noise being dead, but trip metal is just an injection of confusion—why splinter the misfits? We're all in this; there's no reason to take sides.

Forest Juziuk: While wrapping up TM Fest, we realized we had gone into the red—not by much—but it was an exciting realization because we put this together with no corporate money or sponsorships outside of the Knight Foundation grant, private donations, and the good will of a lot of our friends playing, who agreed to not a lot of money.

We're so used to seeing massive bureaucratic institutions go into the red blowing a ton of money on weird, inhuman festivals that we thought: what if Trip Metal was free? We're going to refund the tickets, give people an option to donate to cover the additional costs we incur (which there most definitely will be), and give Detroit a free, all -ges festival of experimental music. It rules. It's so crazy that it's happening.

I've been managing Wolf Eyes for a couple years now and I run the archive, so I feel like I've begun to have an understanding of all the influences that make up their sound and inform noise in general and I feel like we got a pretty great cross-section of weirdness to showcase—including Morton Subotnick's first-ever Detroit appearance. To me, the festival is almost a giant context-builder for Wolf Eyes and noise/experimental/electronic music in general. I consider this the unofficial 20 Years of Wolf Eyes Party.

John Olson on jazz: Wolf sound has always been jazzy influence. The double title "dread" was taken from concept of playing around and adding to the big solid electronic back beat that can be seen as a musical "head." The soloist—language has always added the detail and flow of the jams, especially now in this era. There has always been a simple sketch or rhythm and the jamming over that sketch has been the M.O. from nearly the start of the trio years. Great concern upon lines, harmony, embouchure, and note selection is commonplace in the post Stare Case blues structure Wolf game nowadays. Jazz has always been about personal communication in as many combinations and the "playing" of said ideas as immediately possible. The Eyes shake hands with that concept daily—as well as the music of Clifford Brown, Duke Ellington, John Coltrane, Jackie Mclean, Eric Dolphy, Art Tatum, Bud Shank, Gerry Mulligan, Sun Ra, Sonny Stitt, Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, Lol Coxhill, Abe Kaoru, and countless others. "Jazz it Up."

Nate Young on Captain Beefheart's Trout Mask Replica: Beef-man is self-taught and I listened to Trout Mask until it flipped backwards on my cassette copy on my first trip across country—15 years old—heading to Tucson to get a GED with my pet rat Jack in a bowling bag. Never got that GED but kept on listening to the tape backwards. Then I bought and heard Pussy Galore and Caroliner on the same day. Toxic Ranch Records, Tucson.

On Morton Subotnick's Silver Apples of the Moon: My ex Anna's sister died when she young. She was a magician's assistant, and that was one of the records Anna treasured. Never heard it before then. Heard of it, but never was able to get a copy. Anna introduced me to hip-hop and graffiti culture too. She was a good five to seven years older than me. Older women have always been a big thing in my life.

On Detroit, Michigan: I moved to Detroit with Anna. Southfield and Warren. She was a major player in my Wolf background. She sent me to Europe with frequent flyer miles—first Euro tour. Dilloway too. Love that woman but she got tired of my childish, broke-ass self. Alivia and I moved back to Detroit because we were going to gigs so much in Detroit and needed studio space.

AdHoc Issue 11 is Here

AdHoc Issue 11 is Here

Order a physical copy here and a digital copy here. Subscribe here.

AdHoc Issue 11 is here! This time around:

* Hunter Hunt-Hendrix of Liturgy and Kel Valhaal discusses music and messianic politics.

* John Kowalski of Solar Bears speaks with Jean-Hervé Péron, co-founder of legendary German group faUSt.

* AdHoc's Max Parrott considers the enduring power of malfunctions and glitches in electronic music.

* Bonus: an excerpt of Ted, Cruising, a new erotic novella by Rod Ramble, out now via Hard Books.

* Plus: AdHoc contributors review three dozen recent albums, one sentence at a time.

* Featuring illustrations by Charlie Hankin (The New Yorker), layout and design by Jesse Hlebo, and cover and additional design by J.S. Aurelius (Destruction Unit, Ascetic House).

Get your copy today!

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I write this on the evening of “Super Tuesday,” 2016. As of 11:52pm, Donald Trump, former host of NBC’s The Apprentice, is leading the Republicans with 257 delegates, comfortably ahead of Ted Cruz’s 106 and Marco Rubio’s 67. On the Democrats’ side, Hillary Clinton, with 965 delegates, is poised for a resounding victory over Bernie Sanders, who has won just 317. As of 11:52pm on Super Tuesday, then, it seems like us Americans will be choosing between Trump and Clinton come November—a face-off generations of SNL writers probably never dreamed the show would satirize.

That might change, sure. Cruz and Rubio still have a chance, albeit tiny—not that either of those names is especially comforting. What about Sanders? Or rather, Bernie. No presidential candidate, except perhaps Obama in 2008, has made such an impact on those who (I assume) read, write for, and are featured in AdHoc. If my social media feeds held sway over Super Tuesday, Bernie would probably be up something like 1,200 to 82—but alas, superdelegates don’t run in the same Twitter circles as you and me.

So, even if Bernie’s ascendance has coincided with a spike in political engagement among young people, artists, and musicians, Super Tuesday is proving portentous. Can we make a difference? I’ll say “yes.” However discouraging the results, our generation’s newfound politicism feels like a step in the right direction. It’s great that, in 2016, protest music takes forms other than “Rockin’ in the Free World”—that we have artists like Lotic and M.E.S.H., like Downtown Boys and G.L.O.S.S, acts with vital socio-political commentary to offer and vital aesthetic methods with which to deliver it.

Jean-Hervé Péron of German provocateurs faUSt makes a connection between now and 1968 in the pages of this issue: “Now it's important that we do something,” he says. “It's like in ’68; it’s going overboard.” In us, Péron recognizes the quixotic spirit of his own generation—along with his generation’s potential to fail. But he also knows that whether we win or lose this particular fight, we’ll still be making music. And music, he reminds us, “will always be a problem for the people in power.”

 

Market Hotel Is Back, Shows with DIIV, Faust, The Soft Moon, Silent Servant, Mykki Blanco Announced

Market Hotel Is Back, Shows with DIIV, Faust, The Soft Moon, Silent Servant, Mykki Blanco Announced

After a soft opening with Sleater-Kinney last month, Brooklyn DIY venue Market Hotel will be re-opening for good this January 22nd after being dark for more than 5 years. The space went live with several shows alongside the announcement, some of them were booked by AdHoc. Read on for a taste of what's to come.

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