Posts by AdHoc Staff

AdHoc Issue 23 Features Downtown Boys' Victoria Ruiz and Titus Andronicus' Patrick Stickles

AdHoc Issue 23 Features Downtown Boys' Victoria Ruiz and Titus Andronicus' Patrick Stickles

AdHoc Issue 23 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link.

What does a piece of music say about the person who made it? In AdHoc Issue 23, we hear from artists who build their art upon a framework of personal as well as cultural experience. Victoria Ruiz of Downtown Boys discusses the uphill battle she faces as "a brown, thick, femme frontperson," especially in terms of the expectations placed upon her by audiences and journalists. Still, she notes, these pressures have "made me want to stand closer to the fire and be in this band even more, because I know that there are a lot of people in the world dealing with this experience."

Elsewhere in the issue, Titus Andronicus' Patrick Stickles writes about the importance of all-ages venues in his personal and artistic development, and electronic musician Elysia Crampton talks about how the stories and traditions of the Aymara people have helped shaped her recordings. As with Ruiz, their work is grounded in unique personal experiences, relayed with an honesty and specificity that encourages listeners to contemplate their own experiences in similar ways.

AdHoc Issue 23's contributors:

Patrick Stickles is the singer-songwriter-guitarist of Titus Andronicus. He wrote about all-ages venues for this issue.

Aubrey Nolan is a Queens-based illustrator, cartoonist, and host of the monthly reading series for cartoonists, Panels to the People. She made this issue's illustrations.

Frankie Broyles is in the band Omni. He is a musician/designer from Atlanta, GA, and designed the cover for this issue.

Look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. If you happen to live outside of New York, you may order a copy as well.

 

AdHoc Seeks Events and Editorial Interns For Spring 2018

AdHoc Seeks Events and Editorial Interns For Spring 2018

AdHoc is seeking events and editorial interns to work in our Brooklyn office. All candidates must live in the New York area and be available 12-20 hours per week.

 
Tasks include assisting with copy-editing and fact-checking, research, ticket counts, social media management, handling music submissions, using Photoshop, zine distribution, and, after some training, writing contribution and show booking. You should have excellent research skills, a laptop, and familiarity with the local music scene. The ability to gain school credit for the internship is strongly preferred but not required.
 
Please submit a resume, cover letter, 2 writing samples, and a list of your top 5 albums and tracks of 2017 in an email to internships@adhoc.fm with the subject line “SPRING INTERNSHIP 2018″ by November 15.
 
We look forward to hearing from you.

The Hotelier Field Your Most Pressing Questions

The Hotelier Field Your Most Pressing Questions Illustration by Aubrey Nolan

In #adhoclifeadvice, we ask artists we love to answer questions from you, our readers. This time around, The Hotelier frontman Christian Holden opens up about pursuing a career in music, interacting with fans, and his somewhat unpredictable songwriting process. This article appears in the upcoming AdHoc issue 23. The Hotelier will perform at Brooklyn Bazaar on 11/2 with Oso Oso, Alex Napping, and Common Holly. 
 
@sinaivessel: should i do less music and more gambling
 
Christian: Deciding to do music full time may be enough of a gamble for anybody.
 
@emmathesadgirl: what are your thoughts re: fans sharing stories of how your music has helped them? does it ever get emotionally exhausting for you?
 
Good question. It’s an interesting dynamic. Yes, it can be emotionally exhausting. It can be frustrating for me to not be on the same level emotionally as the person I am talking to. Also, it can be confusing for people to be casual in that conversation. Like, some will act as if we are friends. But I appreciate the moments when I get to let someone be seen for how far they may have come by someone who had a small hand in helping them do that. 
 
@sconeappthebeef: What motivates you the most when it comes to writing & how do you go about writing your music?
 
Motivation and I have a complex relationship. Mostly, the way I go about writing music is locking myself in my house and not coming out until I’ve made something. My ~process~ feels pretty outside my ability to really nail down. There are a couple different people that I am when I write a song. One has a wild imagination, one is a bratty music snob, and one feels like a procrastinating high school student.
 
Feel like you need #adhoclifeadvice? Keep an eye on @adhocfm on Twitter, where we’ll announce the next round of questions.
 

Phil Elverum Made The Cover Art For AdHoc Issue 22

Phil Elverum Made The Cover Art For AdHoc Issue 22

AdHoc Issue 22 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. If you happen to live outside of New York, you may order a copy as well.
 
In our latest issue, responding to a reader’s question, Priests vocalist Katie Alice Greer brings up “the difference between reality-you and dream-you,” and suggests that in order to realize your potential, it’s important to parse those separate identities. Navigating that separation can be tough for artists, as the other musicians featured in these pages—Greta Kline of Frankie Cosmos and LVL UP’s Nick Corbo—have found out. Both write personal music for bands with cult followings, and have noticed that the more they tour and record, the more those identities—as human and as musician—start to merge. Corbo says that his collaboration with his bandmates is “entwined with my life and who I am.” Kline wonders, “Am I my job?” Yet the social aspect of music—from collaborating to engaging with fans—has helped both artists navigate that distinction. As Kline puts it, “Frankie Cosmos is so much bigger than me and who I am.” Sometimes figuring out who you are who you are requires letting others in.
 
AdHoc Issue 22's contributors: 
 
Phil Elverum has produced two decades worth of records as The Microphones and Mount Eerie that span a wide spectrum, from studio heavy atmospheric landscaping to simple, raw songs. He made the cover for this issue.
 
Aubrey Nolan is a Queens-based illustrator, cartoonist, and host of a monthly reading series for cartoonists, Panels to the People. She made the illustrations for this issue.

AdHoc Seeks Events and Editorial Interns For Fall 2017

AdHoc Seeks Events and Editorial Interns For Fall 2017

AdHoc is seeking events and editorial interns to work in our Brooklyn office. All candidates must live in the New York area and be available 12-20 hours per week.
 
Tasks include assisting with copy-editing and fact-checking, research, ticket counts, social media management, handling music submissions, using Photoshop, zine distribution, and, after some training, writing contribution and show booking. You should have excellent research skills, a laptop, and familiarity with the local music scene. The ability to gain school credit for the internship is strongly preferred but not required.
 
Please submit a resume, cover letter, 2 writing samples, and a list of your top 5 albums and tracks of 2017 in an email to internships@adhoc.fm with the subject line “FALL INTERNSHIP 2017″ by August 23rd.
 
We look forward to hearing from you.

AdHoc Issue 21 is Here

AdHoc Issue 21 is Here

AdHoc Issue 21 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. If you happen to live outside of New York, you may order a copy as well.
 
People often praise performers when they “lock into a groove”—when the music they are producing sounds as though it is being made effortlessly, under the artist’s full control. But the folks we spoke to for this issue—Chino Amobi and Laetitia Sadier—actively avoid that sensation of mastery. Amobi—a producer and co-founder of the NON collective—says the aim of his recent album, Paradiso, was to “challenge” himself and the listener alike. Sadier—a founding member of Stereolab—expresses being just as surprised by her recent work with the Laetitia Sadier Source Ensemble as her audiences probably were. Both create music that’s fluid, open, and collaborative—work that can make for tough listening experience at first, but that encourages new modes of thinking while pushing the art form—and the community around it — forward.
 
AdHoc Issue 21's contributors: 
 
Brandon Locher is an artist and musician who lives and works in New York. He made this issue’s cover.
 
Jesse Jerome Jenkins, V (b. 1984) is an American recording artist living and working in Corpus Christi, Texas. The singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and producer is a member of the romance rock band Pure X and releases music on his own as Jesse; he made a visual poem for this issue.
 
Whitney Wei is a Brooklyn-based artist whose work has appeared in Mixmag, The Guardian, and the nightlife zine Club Etiquette, which will soon be available for purchase soon at MoMA PS1’s ARTBOOK. She made the illustrations for this issue.

 

AdHoc Issue 20 is Here

AdHoc Issue 20 is Here Cover by Chris Stewart

AdHoc Issue 20 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. If you happen to live outside of New York, you may order a copy as well.

In AdHoc Issue 20, we get to know three musicians who go out of their way to build community whenever they’re not making great music. Bryan Funck, who tours constantly as the vocalist of Louisiana metal band Thou, runs the website NOLA DIY, which collects information on local shows, bands, venues, and promoters, along with resources for bands just starting out. Moor Mother and Eartheater, in conversation, explain the importance of creating music in the face of systemic obstacles like class inequality and gender-based discrimination—and helping others do the same through collaboration and education. Which is to say, for each of these three, being a musician is certainly about releasing plenty of forward-thinking music—but it’s also about using that platform to help others have their voices heard.

AdHoc Issue 20's contributors:

Alexandra Drewchin is a Queens-based musician who records under the Eartheater name. She conversed with Camae Ayewa of Moor Mother for this issue.

Chris Stewart makes and performs synthy anthems under the moniker Black Marble. He composed and shot the cover for this issue.

Samuel Nigrosh is a Chicago-based illustrator who publishes books and comix under the name Trash City. He made the illustrations for this issue.

Moor Mother on Finding Your People: "We Have to Reach Out"

Moor Mother on Finding Your People: Illustration by Sam Nigrosh.

This article appears in AdHoc Issue 20, out officially later this weekMoor Mother plays Good Room in Brooklyn on June 8 with Elysia Crampton and Total Freedom.

Moor Mother and Eartheater like to keep busy. Moor Mother, whose debut album Fetish Bones came out in 2016, has been touring the globe with her noisey protest music, publishing and lecturing about Afrofuturist and diasporic thought, and organizing events at Community Futures Lab, a Philadelphia multimedia arts and education space she founded with her partner Rasheedah Phillips, the other half of her Black Quantum Futurism collective. Eartheater, real name Alexandra Drewchin, released two acclaimed albums in 2015—Metalepsis and RIP Chrysalis—and has another full-length on the way, all while working as a visual and performance artist, and frequenting local creative hubs like Otion Front Studio in Brooklyn and Outpost Artists Resources in Queens. Both artists contributed to Show Me the Body’s recent CORPUS I mixtape, a collaborative release that aligns with their shared penchants for community-building and genre-bending.

In the following conversation, Moor Mother and Eartheater discuss their tireless work ethic, the artistic scenes around them, and the challenges of being a woman in music.

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Black Marble's Chris Stewart Discusses the Cover of AdHoc Issue 20

Black Marble's Chris Stewart Discusses the Cover of AdHoc Issue 20

Ahead of AdHoc 20, which will be out next week, we're sharing the issue's cover by Black Marble's Chris Stewart. Black Marble will play at Good Room on June 6 with Body of Light and Public Memory. Stewart had the following to say about the image he made.

I came up with the idea while trying to imagine a votive or funeral arrangement for a certain romanticized (by some, not by me) American experience. The current POTUS 'brand' was honed/perfected in the '70s and '80s when the existential threat of Communism combined with a relatively prosperous time for the West sort of clarified and simplified American experience for many as a just and invaluable right to pursue individual prosperity.

The piece on this issue's cover is meant to, from an anthropological point of view, suggest the slow death of that 'America' and frame the current political climate as its death rattle. It's also a last minute attempt to recapture some of its perceived simplicity and security for those that benefited from it the first time around, or with the passage of time misremember it as better than it was.

AdHoc Issue 19 is Here

AdHoc Issue 19 is Here Cover by Girlpool

AdHoc Issue 19 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. (Those of you outside New York City can order a copy as well.)

In this issue, we explore music as a social act. Speaking to Emilie Friedlander, Pharmakon’s Margaret Chardiet explains the importance of audience engagement in her live shows, and how that sensibility informed her new record, Contact. Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad of Girlpool—who also have a new record, Powerplant, in the works—unpack the role of person-to-person connectivity in their music. In conversation with Hand Habits’ Meg Duffy, they discuss their closeness as an artistic and social unit, and how introducing new people into the Girlpool live band was almost as tricky as opening up a romantic relationship. Both Pharmakon and Girlpool articulate reasons for making art that move beyond personal expression or gratification, and into something more inclusive.

AdHoc Issue 19's contributors:

Girlpool is a Los Angeles-based band whose founding members, Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad, made the collage that appears on this issue’s cover.

Meg Duffy is a Los Angeles-based musician who performs under the name Hand Habits; her album, Wildly Idle (Humble Before the Void), is out now via Woodsist. Meg interviewed Cleo and Harmony for this issue.

Leesh Adamerovich is a Brooklyn-based illustrator who enjoys collaborating with musicians. Her work is influenced by ’70s music, animation, and quiet moments, and she made the illustrations for this issue.