Posts by AdHoc Staff

AdHoc Seeks Events and Editorial Interns For Fall 2017

AdHoc Seeks Events and Editorial Interns For Fall 2017

AdHoc is seeking events and editorial interns to work in our Brooklyn office. All candidates must live in the New York area and be available 12-20 hours per week.
 
Tasks include assisting with copy-editing and fact-checking, research, ticket counts, social media management, handling music submissions, using Photoshop, zine distribution, and, after some training, writing contribution and show booking. You should have excellent research skills, a laptop, and familiarity with the local music scene. The ability to gain school credit for the internship is strongly preferred but not required.
 
Please submit a resume, cover letter, 2 writing samples, and a list of your top 5 albums and tracks of 2017 in an email to internships@adhoc.fm with the subject line “FALL INTERNSHIP 2017″ by August 23rd.
 
We look forward to hearing from you.

AdHoc Issue 21 is Here

AdHoc Issue 21 is Here

AdHoc Issue 21 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. If you happen to live outside of New York, you may order a copy as well.
 
People often praise performers when they “lock into a groove”—when the music they are producing sounds as though it is being made effortlessly, under the artist’s full control. But the folks we spoke to for this issue—Chino Amobi and Laetitia Sadier—actively avoid that sensation of mastery. Amobi—a producer and co-founder of the NON collective—says the aim of his recent album, Paradiso, was to “challenge” himself and the listener alike. Sadier—a founding member of Stereolab—expresses being just as surprised by her recent work with the Laetitia Sadier Source Ensemble as her audiences probably were. Both create music that’s fluid, open, and collaborative—work that can make for tough listening experience at first, but that encourages new modes of thinking while pushing the art form—and the community around it — forward.
 
AdHoc Issue 21's contributors: 
 
Brandon Locher is an artist and musician who lives and works in New York. He made this issue’s cover.
 
Jesse Jerome Jenkins, V (b. 1984) is an American recording artist living and working in Corpus Christi, Texas. The singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and producer is a member of the romance rock band Pure X and releases music on his own as Jesse; he made a visual poem for this issue.
 
Whitney Wei is a Brooklyn-based artist whose work has appeared in Mixmag, The Guardian, and the nightlife zine Club Etiquette, which will soon be available for purchase soon at MoMA PS1’s ARTBOOK. She made the illustrations for this issue.

 

AdHoc Issue 20 is Here

AdHoc Issue 20 is Here Cover by Chris Stewart

AdHoc Issue 20 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. If you happen to live outside of New York, you may order a copy as well.

In AdHoc Issue 20, we get to know three musicians who go out of their way to build community whenever they’re not making great music. Bryan Funck, who tours constantly as the vocalist of Louisiana metal band Thou, runs the website NOLA DIY, which collects information on local shows, bands, venues, and promoters, along with resources for bands just starting out. Moor Mother and Eartheater, in conversation, explain the importance of creating music in the face of systemic obstacles like class inequality and gender-based discrimination—and helping others do the same through collaboration and education. Which is to say, for each of these three, being a musician is certainly about releasing plenty of forward-thinking music—but it’s also about using that platform to help others have their voices heard.

AdHoc Issue 20's contributors:

Alexandra Drewchin is a Queens-based musician who records under the Eartheater name. She conversed with Camae Ayewa of Moor Mother for this issue.

Chris Stewart makes and performs synthy anthems under the moniker Black Marble. He composed and shot the cover for this issue.

Samuel Nigrosh is a Chicago-based illustrator who publishes books and comix under the name Trash City. He made the illustrations for this issue.

Moor Mother on Finding Your People: "We Have to Reach Out"

Moor Mother on Finding Your People: Illustration by Sam Nigrosh.

This article appears in AdHoc Issue 20, out officially later this weekMoor Mother plays Good Room in Brooklyn on June 8 with Elysia Crampton and Total Freedom.

Moor Mother and Eartheater like to keep busy. Moor Mother, whose debut album Fetish Bones came out in 2016, has been touring the globe with her noisey protest music, publishing and lecturing about Afrofuturist and diasporic thought, and organizing events at Community Futures Lab, a Philadelphia multimedia arts and education space she founded with her partner Rasheedah Phillips, the other half of her Black Quantum Futurism collective. Eartheater, real name Alexandra Drewchin, released two acclaimed albums in 2015—Metalepsis and RIP Chrysalis—and has another full-length on the way, all while working as a visual and performance artist, and frequenting local creative hubs like Otion Front Studio in Brooklyn and Outpost Artists Resources in Queens. Both artists contributed to Show Me the Body’s recent CORPUS I mixtape, a collaborative release that aligns with their shared penchants for community-building and genre-bending.

In the following conversation, Moor Mother and Eartheater discuss their tireless work ethic, the artistic scenes around them, and the challenges of being a woman in music.

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Black Marble's Chris Stewart Discusses the Cover of AdHoc Issue 20

Black Marble's Chris Stewart Discusses the Cover of AdHoc Issue 20

Ahead of AdHoc 20, which will be out next week, we're sharing the issue's cover by Black Marble's Chris Stewart. Black Marble will play at Good Room on June 6 with Body of Light and Public Memory. Stewart had the following to say about the image he made.

I came up with the idea while trying to imagine a votive or funeral arrangement for a certain romanticized (by some, not by me) American experience. The current POTUS 'brand' was honed/perfected in the '70s and '80s when the existential threat of Communism combined with a relatively prosperous time for the West sort of clarified and simplified American experience for many as a just and invaluable right to pursue individual prosperity.

The piece on this issue's cover is meant to, from an anthropological point of view, suggest the slow death of that 'America' and frame the current political climate as its death rattle. It's also a last minute attempt to recapture some of its perceived simplicity and security for those that benefited from it the first time around, or with the passage of time misremember it as better than it was.

AdHoc Issue 19 is Here

AdHoc Issue 19 is Here Cover by Girlpool

AdHoc Issue 19 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. (Those of you outside New York City can order a copy as well.)

In this issue, we explore music as a social act. Speaking to Emilie Friedlander, Pharmakon’s Margaret Chardiet explains the importance of audience engagement in her live shows, and how that sensibility informed her new record, Contact. Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad of Girlpool—who also have a new record, Powerplant, in the works—unpack the role of person-to-person connectivity in their music. In conversation with Hand Habits’ Meg Duffy, they discuss their closeness as an artistic and social unit, and how introducing new people into the Girlpool live band was almost as tricky as opening up a romantic relationship. Both Pharmakon and Girlpool articulate reasons for making art that move beyond personal expression or gratification, and into something more inclusive.

AdHoc Issue 19's contributors:

Girlpool is a Los Angeles-based band whose founding members, Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad, made the collage that appears on this issue’s cover.

Meg Duffy is a Los Angeles-based musician who performs under the name Hand Habits; her album, Wildly Idle (Humble Before the Void), is out now via Woodsist. Meg interviewed Cleo and Harmony for this issue.

Leesh Adamerovich is a Brooklyn-based illustrator who enjoys collaborating with musicians. Her work is influenced by ’70s music, animation, and quiet moments, and she made the illustrations for this issue.

Dudes Need to Stop Being Assholes: Matt Korvette of Pissed Jeans Discusses Toxic Masculinity

Dudes Need to Stop Being Assholes: Matt Korvette of Pissed Jeans Discusses Toxic Masculinity Illustration by Samuel Nigrosh

This article appears in AdHoc Issue 18.

Romance and masculinity have been enduring fascinations for Philadelphia-based punk band Pissed Jeans, from their 2007 Sub Pop debut Hope for Men to the upcoming Why Love Now, out February 24. In advance of the band’s record release show at Brooklyn Bazaar that same night, we asked frontman Matt Korvette what contemporary straight men are getting wrong about relationships and other social behavior.

AdHoc: Several of Pissed Jeans’ records explore the ins and outs of modern masculinity. What draws you to this topic?

Matt Korvette: I’ve always been fascinated by myself, my motivations, and being a man. It’s probably a bit narcissistic, even if I’m being self-critical, but my lyrics for the band have pretty much always been based on things in my life that I’m actively pondering, curious about, angry about, or sad about. And my identity and how I fit into the world has always been a part of that. I also enjoy taking shots at guys and the generic vision of masculinity, since it’s a ripe target for criticism and I don’t think it gets nearly enough grief—especially from people who fit within it.

 

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AdHoc Issue 18 is Here

AdHoc Issue 18 is Here Cover by Salina Ladha

AdHoc Issue 18 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. (Those of you outside New York City can order a copy as well.)

In this issue, we turn our attention to love and human connection. Maria Sherman talks about Indie Pop Prom, an annual concert she organizes around her birthday (and Valentine’s Day), and how she flipped the heteronormative high school tradition into a celebration of female artists. Matt Korvette—whose band, Pissed Jeans, is set to release a new LP called Why Love Now—muses about toxic masculinity, and how it’s time modern men learned to stop being assholes. Finally, Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Vagabon, aka Lætitia Tamko, considers her agency to effect political change as both an artist and a citizen, within not only the musical underground but also the “real world”—two spheres that aren’t as different as they may seem. Their stories remind us that our communities are built on person-to-person interaction, and that engaging with and caring for those around us is a crucial step toward building the world we want to see.

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AdHoc Issue 18's contributors:

Maria Sherman is a culture writer and recent New York City transplant living in Philadelphia. For this issue, she wrote an essay about Indie Pop Prom.

Samuel Nigrosh is a Chicago- based illustrator who publishes books and comix under the name Trash City. He drew the illustrations in this issue.

Salina Ladha is a ceramicist, painter, and illustrator based out of Montreal, Canada. She made the art that appears on the cover of this issue.

Mind Over Mirrors Made Us A Restorative Mix

Mind Over Mirrors Made Us A Restorative Mix Jaime Fennelly, photo by Timothy Breen

Chicago-based harmonium and synthesizer maestro Jaime Fennelly, a.k.a. Mind Over Mirrors, enlisted an ensemble of musicians including Janet Beveridge Bean (Eleventh Dream Day), Jim Becker (Califone), Haley Fohr (Circuit des Yeux), and Jon Mueller (Death Blues) for Undying Color, likely his most assured statement—among many qualified others—yet. Undying Color is out February 17 via Paradise of Bachelors. To mark the release, Fennelly made AdHoc a mix of music he's been spinning lately entitled Punch Drunk & Euphoric Sustains Vol. 2; read what he had to say about the collection below and check out the tracklist after the jump.

From whirling dervish ceremony opener “Taksim," by Turkish Ney-master Hayri Tümer, to Willie Dunn’s vision inducing “Peruvian Dream,” from Midori Takdada’s patient organ-like shakuhachi to the recently reissued multi-voiced Casio jam by Yishak Banjaw, and everything between and beyond, this is a collection of music that has been on regular rotation over the last few months, maybe even years.  Each of these records has served me personally as a temporary balm from the day-to-day onslaught of America’s new “presidential” face, which more resembles a half-PT Barnum, half-Mussolini (I must credit writer Mike Davis for that accurate comparison) megalomaniac. Let’s take a moment or two when we need it for ourselves, and then move back to being engaged and supporting our fellow humans, non-humans and environment any which way we can.

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AdHoc Issue 17 is Here

AdHoc Issue 17 is Here

AdHoc Issue 17 is here! Download a PDF of the zine at this link, and look out for physical copies both at our shows and at record stores, bookstores, coffee shops, and community centers throughout the city. (Those of you outside New York City can order a copy here as well.)

The American underground broke into mainstream awareness as 2016 drew to a close, but not for the reasons we would have hoped. On December 4, a gunman walked into Comet Ping Pong, a D.C. pizza restaurant and vital art and music venue, searching for child sex slaves. Comet and its employees had already been the target of online and phone-based harassment for weeks as a result of the Pizzagate conspiracy, in which Reddit and Voat users alleged that John Podesta and Hillary Clinton were involved in a sex-trafficking ring based out of the restaurant, among others. Though the gunman didn’t harm anyone, his actions demonstrated the perils of post-truthist rumor-mongering in a very real, very frightening way. In this issue, Comet regulars and D.C.-based punk band Priests discuss—in addition to their label, Sister Polygon, and their debut LP, Nothing Feels Natural—their real-life brush with Pizzagate, and the threats progressive artistic communities are facing from the far-right.

Just the day before the Comet incident, those of us on the East Coast had awoken to news of a horrifying fire at Oakland DIY venue the Ghost Ship. Cash Askew, who played guitar in the dreamy sounding rock duo Them Are Us Too, was among the fire’s 36 victims; here, her bandmate and friend Kennedy Ashlyn remembers Askew’s inimitable strength and spirit. A month after her death, it’s still impossible to reckon with what happened, not to mention the chilling feeling that this could have happened to us. One of the numerous after-effects of the fire has been an unfair critique of electronic music and DIY practices in the mainstream media, and an ensuing nationwide crackdown on DIY spaces, eliminating safe spaces for people who often don’t have anywhere else to go. Even when displaced, artists in these communities will keep going—but paying tribute to the creative spirit of people like Cash Askew and of artist-run venues all over the country feels more urgent than ever.

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AdHoc Issue 17's contributors:

Stef Chura is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist from Detroit whose debut album, Messes, is being released on January 27 via Urinal Cake Records. She interviewed the band Priests for this issue.

Kennedy Ashlyn sings and plays keys for the band Them Are Us Too. In this issue, she remembers her beloved bandmate and friend Cash Askew, who passed away in the Oakland warehouse fire of December 2016.

Jordan Reyes is a nomadic writer who currently pays rent in Minnesota; he plays industrial music as Taphophile and runs Moniker Records alongside Robert Manis. In this issue, Lee Ranaldo told Jordan about his favorite acoustic guitar.

Lee Ranaldo is a musician, composer, visual artist, writer, producer, and a founding member of the band Sonic Youth. He spoke about his experience with Gurian guitars in this issue.

Samuel Nigrosh is a Chicago-based illustrator who publishes books and comix under the name Trash City. He made the illustrations for this issue.

Daniele Daniele is a real renaissance woman. She lives in Washington, D.C. and performs with Priests and Gauche. She designed and hand-painted the cover of this month’s zine.