Posts by Taraka Larson

Girlseeker: Stripclubs, Vertical Time, and Creating a New Emotion

Girlseeker: Stripclubs, Vertical Time, and Creating a New Emotion

If you are seeking to know Girlseeker, you will find no one. If you call "1-800-GREED," the title of their LP debut, you won't get an answer; but if you listen hard, you may just hear transmissions from the late Frank Zappa whispering the question you were aching to ask.

Girlseeker speak thru paradox. Even as I was conducting this trans-Atlantic gchat interview between LA to Copenhagen, their responses were sometimes more like riddles than answers. Their music is equally enigmatic, slipping between echoes of '80s hair metal, keyboards played in an empty gymnasium at a rural high school jazz recital, and a lone baritone voice summoning stray dogs from a far canyon. The melodies are familiar but unplaceable, emerging from a place where amnesia would seem to preclude memory. Here, you cry in order to remember how to laugh, crash ashore to remember how high the waves took you, seek solice in shadows to remember what the sun felt like. Without memory, there is no nostalgia. Without time, there is no apocalypse. When I asked Girlseeker to describe their music, they said it sounds like “NOW."

This I do know: When I first discovered Girlseeker, I felt like I hadn’t just discovered a new band, but a new emotion. I listen to them and forget where I am and what I am, but most of all, I remember why I listen to music-- to dwell in that lonely space between everywhere and nowhere, and render it beautiful.

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Prince Rama's Taraka Larson Interviews Iasos

Prince Rama's Taraka Larson Interviews Iasos

There are few men out there who can say that they heard synthesized music before the synth was ever invented. Still fewer can claim writing the score to what people hear when they die-- or knowing what it is like to be both a man and a woman. Iasos can do all of the above. When I met with him in Brooklyn last week, prior to his Body Actualized-curated New York debut, I was as skeptical as I would be with anyone whose name conjures such a cloud of controversial claims.

But whether you’re a believer or non-believer, being in the presence of someone whose spiritual belief system, personal cosmology, daily meditation, and musical practice are so interwoven is nothing short of awe-inspiring. And when that hailed grandfather of New Age music can kick back and laugh about coffee and women amidst acoustic levitation and hollow earth theories, Iasos demonstrates that it is also possible to be both "time architect" and human being, which is perhaps one of the most controversial ideas surrounding him to date. Read on for some excerpts from our hour-and-half-long conversation, which will be published in full this Spring in issue one of the Ad Hoc zine.

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