Posts by Emma May

“Good Music is Supposed to be Funny”: An Interview with Ontario’s Partner

“Good Music is Supposed to be Funny”: An Interview with Ontario’s Partner Photography by Colin Medley

If there’s one thing Lucy Niles and Josée Caron drive home with the absurdist pop- punk they make as Partner, it’s that laughter can be key to survival. The Ontario rock band’s discography includes rambunctious, Ween-inspired odes to actress and queer icon Ellen Page, weed-induced ice cream binges, and stories of faking sick to watch Judge Judy. 
 
Niles and Caro have been friends since college, and describe their music as an “exploration of intimacy, friendship, sexuality, drugs, and the existential predicament of being a lesbian barista in the year 2017.” They are both queer, and frequently get asked if they are together. In response, they wrote a song called “We’re Gay, But Not For Each Other.”
 
Ahead of their show at Silent Barn on April 13, we talked with the band about queer visibility, the subversive possibilities of humor, and Blink-182. 
 
AdHoc: How did the band start?
 
Lucy Niles: We all met at university.  
 
Josée Caron: We hung out a lot at the meal hall...we had a lot of good times. [Laughs.]
 
Was there a specific moment when you knew that you wanted to start a band together?
 
Lucy: [When we first met], we knew that we wanted to start a band together, but we didn't start this band until like seven years later. We were in other bands together before that.
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Slowing Down with Snail Mail

Slowing Down with Snail Mail Illustration by Anna True

A lot has changed for Lindsey Jordan since she played her first show in 2015, assembling an ad hoc crew to open for Priests and Sheer Mag at a festival. Snail Mail’s jangly, introspective sound—layered with the Ellicot City, Maryland native’s carefully constructed lyrics—belies the band’s spontaneous origins. In a little under three years, they’ve released an EP on Priest’s Sister Polygon label, toured the United States, and signed to a major indie—all while Lindsey was finishing up high school. Ahead of Snail Mail’s debut studio album, which is due out on Matador this summer, she spoke to us about being a feminist musician, balancing schoolwork with touring, and growing up. 
 
What inspired you to start playing music?
 
I don't know—it's just a hobby. I started playing guitar when I was five, and I didn't start writing songs until I was 12 or 13. I recorded an EP on Apple Garageband a really long time ago that's not on the internet anymore, and I formed a live band to play this one show—just for fun. Then we recorded the EP, Habit, because we had some friends that were willing to help us with it. Originally, our goal was to do these five or six songs, or whatever. I mean, I never really intended for it to go well, you know? 
 
What's the scene like in Baltimore? Was there any particular show or band or space that was really inspiring to you?
 
I hung out a lot at Black Cat in DC. I saw a lot of punk bands there, and I feel like that world was pretty encouraging as far as starting your own band. I don't know about now, but there are a lot of really great record stores in Baltimore. Celebrated Summer in Hampden is where I discovered a lot of the punk music I really love now.
 
DC is a really big place for punk. It's a really big creative hub, with a lot of DIY spaces, and there are a lot of young people doing awesome stuff. I have some friends who play in punk bands in Baltimore. I think [Baltimore has] got a culture of people who work really hard and think outside the box.
 
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Big White's "How Did You Find Out" is a Hilarious Ode to the 80s

Big White's Photography by Jordanne Chant

Australian indie outfit Big White’s “How Did You Find Out” is a humorous ode to the 80s complete with thick-framed glasses, awkward mullets, and mom jeans. The video’s grainy, VHS aesthetics are a perfect pair with the upbeat, synth-driven, New Wave-inspired track. 
 
The band got their start after they were spotted by Burger Records scouts at a pub in Sydney. Following their debut album On + On, the band went on a nine-week tour across their native Australia, Europe, and North America. Their newest video, ”How Do You Find Out,” reflects the band’s DIY ethos. Using inexpensive materials and the help of their friends, Big White explores themes of misconception and failure. 
 
"Our approach to everything is to do it yourself. With a little help from friends along the way, we tend to take things into our own hands,” Big White’s Jack T. Wotton tells AdHoc over email. “We are playing with the idea that it doesn't matter what you say, it's what you do. There's no truth in stories, and that's all the more reason to tell them."
 
The band is currently gearing up for their sophomore album, Street Talk, out via Modern Sky on March 30. They play Berlin on March 9 and Alphaville on March 10. Watch “How Did You Find Out” below. 
 

On Yes and No, Anna McClellan Finds Closure

On Yes and No, Anna McClellan Finds Closure Photography by Ebru Yildiz

Growing up, Anna McClellan says she believed the only path to happiness was through external validation and a highly idealized version of romantic love. After a particularly difficult break up, McClellan drove from her hometown of Omaha to Los Angeles, hoping to gain some perspective. From Los Angeles, she drove to the Southeast, and then decided to move to New York City, where she lives now. After spending hours alone on the road, McClellan realized that in order to truly find contentedness, she needed to discover self-acceptance. 
 
McClellan’s recently released second record, Yes and No, is a product of that journey. The album's booming vocals, laid-back guitar riffs, and winding piano melodies reflect the artist's growth and autonomy. On "Flailing Orbits," McClellan triumpantly sings, "For the first time in a while, I'm not dying to see your smile/ I don't mind if our stars twinkling never intermingle again." Speaking with AdHoc over the phone, she describes the record as a “circle,” a representation of the closure she discovered while recording. Although her journey to New York is over and the record is out, McClellan’s not stopping anytime soon. To McClellan, a circle is endless. “It also never stops; it keeps going,” she says.
 
Yes and No is available now via Father/Daughter Records. You can catch the record release show with Navy Gangs, Veronica’s Band and Rats Mouth at Alphaville on March 8.
 
AdHoc: How do New York and Omaha compare to one another? 
 
Anna McClellan: I moved once [before], back in 2015. That was the first time I moved to New York. And that time, it was a lot harder [to move]. I think the hardest part [about New York] for me is the physical way that it affected my body to be in the two different places. New York is really exhausting in that way—just trying to get around everywhere. In Omaha, you drive and it takes five minutes to get anywhere that you need to go. But [in New York], there is just so much time spent commuting. I found that really hard to adjust to. It added a lot of tension in my body. 

 

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Wharf Cat Records Releases ACLU Benefit Compilation Record

Wharf Cat Records Releases ACLU Benefit Compilation Record

Wharf Cat Records has teamed up with over 20 artists, including Palberta, Alice Cohen, and Profligate, to raise funds for the American Civil Liberties Union. The multigenre record, ACLU Benefit Compilation,  is the brainchild of Wharf Cat Record’s Michelle Nigro, and is a result of the donated time and efforts of an expansive network of musicians, engineers, and manufacturers. For every $32 double LP, a minimum of $30 will go to the non-profit organization. 

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Relive High School in The Happy Fits's “Best Tears” Video

Relive High School in The Happy Fits's “Best Tears” Video

The Happy Fits create fun-loving and upbeat indie rock that makes even the worst scenarios—like antagonizing high school bullies-—a little bit more tolerable. The Pittstown, New Jersey-based group, which comprises Calvin Langman on vocals and cello, Ross Monteith on guitar, and Luke Davis on drums, formed in 2016 with the purpose of fundraising for local charities.  Afterwards, they released a four song EP, Awfully Apeelin’. A week after the EP’s release, their single “While You Fade Away” reached #5 on Spotify’s Top 50 Viral Global Chart. The band is now gearing up for the release of their debut album Concentrate, released in partnership with Pledge Music, out on May 25th. 
 
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On Cranberry, Hovvdy Finds A Sense of Home

On Cranberry, Hovvdy Finds A Sense of Home Photography by Bronwyn Walls

Will Taylor and Charlie Martin met through mutual friends in the Austin music scene in 2014. They clicked automatically, sharing a fondness for the lo-fi sonics of home recordings and a common background in percussion. Soon after, they began recording no-frills, dreamy bedroom-pop on their iPhones, and released their first EP and cassette, ep, in December 2014.
 
Though they both grew up in Dallas, the band cites Austin—with its slow pace, expansive living spaces, and supportive community—as an inspiration. The hushed, fuzzy sounds on Cranberry, their second album, emit a feeling of intimate familiarity, the feeling of being at home.
 
Cranberry is out February 9 via Double Double Whammy. Ahead of their sold out album release show at Baby’s All Right tonight February 16, we talked with the band about recording on iPhones, taking up new instruments, and wanting to become a “shredder.”
 
AdHoc: How did Hovvdy begin?
 
Will Taylor: We met through mutual friends playing music in Austin. We hadn’t met until midway through 2014, and when we did, we decided that we’d meet up and hang out, and pretty quickly we shared songs that we had been working on at that time. We aligned stylistically and recorded some songs together. From there, continuing it felt like the right thing to do. It’s fun still. 
 
Charlie Martin: I second that. 

 

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The Family Crest's New Video Is a Daytime TV Parody

The Family Crest's New Video Is a Daytime TV Parody Photograph by Christopher M. Howard

San Francisco's The Family Crest is not your run-of-the-mill indie rock band. With seven core musicians, and several hundred "Extended Family" members who have contributed to their music, the group likes to take the unconventional route in their music-making. Take, for example, their new video for “Never Gonna Stop,” a track from their forthcoming The War: Act I. Stitching together over ten comedic sketches, which range from a parody of The Joy of Painting to a reenactment of Godzilla, it encapsulates the ridiculousness of daytime television.

 

Liam McCormck, founder, as well as vocals and lead guitar, of The Family Crest, told via email AdHoc that making the video was a "very DIY process," with the band collectively creating "about 25 different individual stations." "It took a lot of production creativity, from figuring out convertible rentals to digging through our closets for costumes," he wrote. "We had a lot of fun with it. It put many of us out of our comfort zones, which is always a good thing in the end." McCormick says that his overall goal for the video was to convey feeling "of someone flipping through channels on TV, seemingly endlessly, with all of us playing out various tableaux."

 

"It all started in on a 1AM phone call, as things usually do, where Liam told me that Laura had an amazing idea of putting John in a leotard and having him teach a workout class, '80s style," the video's director, Keith Lancaster, told AdHoc. "John is basically the designated cartoon character of the bunch. We thought it would be even better to make something as if you’re flipping through channels on the TV, and he is the main character in everything that pops up. But then we got the rest of the band involved, and it became something way more collaborative and fun. I’m still kind of surprised that we pulled it off in such a short amount of time and it [came] out nearly identical to how it was in my head. It’s really fun to see the personalities of everybody shine through."

 

You can watch the video for "Never Gonna Stop" below.

 

Miles Francis is Making Music on His Own Terms

Miles Francis is Making Music on His Own Terms Photography by Charles Billot

New York City-based singer and multi-instrumentalist Miles Francis has collaborated with the likes of Sharon Jones and Tunde Adebimpe. Now, he's branching out on his own, filtering his training as an Afrobeat percussionist into his electropop-leaning debut album, Swimmers. To celebrate his recent three-date residency at C’mon Everybody, we talked about mentorship, David Bowie, and the responsibilities that come with being an artist.
 
AdHoc: How did Miles Francis come about? 
 
Miles Francis: It's something that I've done my whole life. Most young musicians get swept up in whatever opportunities come to them. And I was very fortunate to be swept up with Antibalas and Will Butler and a bunch of artists I've collaborated with over the years. 
 
[Miles Francis] came about as a result of the different collaborations and phases of my career so far all sort of coming to a head. At a certain point, I had to basically get all these ideas out. It just made sense for me to do it alone, because that's sort of where I'm most at home. It was just time for me to pursue myself.

 

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Brooklyn-based Barrie Found Their Bassist on Tinder

Brooklyn-based Barrie Found Their Bassist on Tinder Photography by Daniel Topete

The members of Brooklyn-based indie outfit Barrie hail, variously, from Baltimore, Boston, São Paulo, London, and Upstate New York, but they met at Greenpoint's The Lot Radio, where half of the band worked. Despite their geographical differences, they create a cohesive sound on "Canyons," their psychedelic, bass-heavy new single. On the heels of the release of "Canyons," we caught up with the band and discussed Tinder, their writing process, and their upcoming show at Baby's All Right on February 8 with NADINE and Lexie. You can listen to their new single, "Canyons," below. 

AdHoc: You’re all from very different places: England, Brazil, and the East Coast. How did you all meet?

Barrie: We all met though the Lot Radio in Greenpoint, through our friend Joe Van Moyland. He actually had the idea for the band and connected us all.

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